Home > On Teaching > Stop pointing fingers

Stop pointing fingers

Tonight I’d like to share a short story. As I left church one day a couple years ago, I was in admiration of all the beauty. Parents, toddlers, grandparents and smiling faces surrounded me on a picture perfect holiday.

I felt this sense of emptiness that I had for a while. My longing grew. The feeling overwhelmed me. I couldn’t take it anymore. I wanted to help. It felt as though there were a hole in my heart that needed to be filled.

I wanted to do the right thing. It’s hard to do that sometimes because people don’t always understand it. It’s hard to voice your beliefs and be vulnerable to others opinions, rejections, or dislikes—especially if they do not agree with you.

But there’s something in my heart. It consumes me. I want to help through what I’ve been through. I want to share my experiences, and help others heal from bad ones. I simply want to contribute before it’s too late. So tonight I want to say…

Stop pointing fingers.

We have enough problems. We are not in this state because of someone else like “the president.” It’s not all “his” fault, and it is not “theirs” either. We are in this state because we are. It is probably worse now than it ever has been. War, poverty, and racism are only a few of the things we are dealing with.

Stop pointing fingers.

The world doesn’t’ need it. Don’t we have enough problems? The world is not in the state it is because of “someone else.” It is not this country’s fault. Sometimes things go wrong because they do, and we can sit here and play the BLAME game all day long.

I had this longing, and this urge to try and do something good. Too often others turn away from religion because every time you turn around someone is blaming someone else. Maybe things just fell apart. It’s the people that use the principles to rule and to condemn, and to point fingers at.

Let’s stop doing that!

The cost of giving hope is immeasurable, and the rewards of it are satisfying to everyone. ~Zina Hermez

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