Home > On Teaching > How is tragedy better than winning the lottery?

How is tragedy better than winning the lottery?

Hello friends.

I hope you had a nice Easter with your family. Easter is one of my favorite holidays. It reminds me of new beginnings, because the Lord rose again to save my life. It’s a precious day, and this year it came at the perfect time. I’ve been stressed. It’s been a little while since I’ve written anything, I apologize.

Zina (2)This past week we had teacher observations. This is where someone from administration comes in to observe your class. It went well, and I got great feedback. Now that it’s over with I’m more relaxed : )

I’ve been thinking…

What if life were a place where we weren’t measured by our performance? Where we were all accepted? Never felt less then or like we had to compete? Where we experienced love, and had no feelings of self-pity or defeat? I try to imagine this, I know it must exist. I think this is what a glimpse of heaven is like.

Teachers work hard, but don’t always gain the proper respect. They sometimes have to deal with smirks and students who behave badly, that sit in the back.

Teachers put in endless hours, but their work and effort go unnoticed sometimes. At the same time they can be loved and adored.

A teacher has to deal with all personalities. She has no choice but to learn every person, to deal with every facet of life.

Whatever your career, I’m sure it’s the same. We all have our challenges, and there are personal ones too. I never wanted to be complacent, meaning, accept my physical challenge as a reason to not extend myself or grow, simply because it’s hard to move.

I read in an article that people who’ve suffered trauma are happier than those who win the lottery. Because they know their power has to come from within. Where the lottery winner believes the money will now bring them happiness; but with time they learn the money didn’t bring them happiness but only comfort, because happiness can only come from within.

Susan Taylor says “Seeds of faith are always within us; sometimes it takes a crisis to nourish and encourage their growth.” When you’ve gone through something tragic, you can feel a deeper sense of appreciation for life.

Don’t get me wrong. There are days where you will “not feel so high” but resilience is key. It’s if you bounce back. You’re ok as long as you don’t stay stuck in “woe is me.” That pattern is not very healthy.

Every day is a gift. Jesus taught me that. And if I take a look at the suffering I’ve endured, it’s nothing compared to what he went through for me. Every day brings hope and opportunity to heal, love, and experience the beauty of life.

How about you? What have you been through? Have you had a difficult situation that has forced you to grow? Feel free to share your thoughts with me.

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Categories: On Teaching
  1. April 5, 2013 at 9:11 am

    What an intriguing thought that people who suffer trauma are happier because they know the power comes from within.

    Yes, definitely I’ve been through difficult times which have helped me to grow especially the last five years. Rapid growth has come because I’ve been forced out of my comfort zone over and over.

    Job said that adversity opens our ears to hear. I find that thought to be intriguing and true. In the midst of difficulties, I often ask, “Lord what do you want me to learn from this? How do you want me to change? How do you want me to grow.”

    I love this thought about how in the midst of our suffering, “Every day brings hope and opportunity to heal, love, and experience the beauty of life.”

    You’re a beautiful example of someone who’s has grown through extreme difficulties and you continue to create beauty out of suffering,

    Keep up the good writing and sharing!

    Like

    • April 5, 2013 at 12:06 pm

      Thank you so much Sharon! I’m glad this inspired you. You are a great example for me too, as I have learned so much about life from you. You have a great spirit, and a wonderful attitude. I’m so thankful for all of your support this past year, thanks for being such a good friend 🙂

      Like

  2. April 18, 2013 at 12:15 pm

    Great work Zina. Hard to improve on Sharon’s comment above. You are an inspiration to me and a great example of how to apply Biblical principles to times of suffering and to come out a better person.

    Like

    • April 18, 2013 at 9:14 pm

      Hi Pete! That really means a lot to me, and thank you for saying I inspire you. It’s so nice to hear from you! I hope all is well.

      Like

  3. April 24, 2013 at 12:04 pm

    We are so thankful for our kids teachers. At the beginning of every year, we let the teachers know that we stand firmly behind them. In our eyes, all teachers are innocent until proven guilty. Instead of rushing to judgment we give our teachers the benefit of the doubt that any problem exists with our child not the teacher. I wish more parents would do the same. I suspect job satisfaction from teachers would sky rocket!

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    • April 24, 2013 at 9:48 pm

      Hi Shannon! That is so nice that you make a conscious effort to let your children’s teachers know that you support them. I think you’re right, sometimes teachers are misjudged or judged too quickly. It is nice that you always assume first it is not the teacher, but the child who may have the problem. I’m working with adults now, but I’ve worked with many children in the past. Thanks so much for sharing your thoughts!

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